Tuesday, 22/8/2017 | 1:02 UTC+1
Britennis

The following is a list of men currently actively ranked between 1-1000 on the ATP World Tour. For players ranked between 1000-2000 on the ATP tour, click here. For players ranked 2000+ on the ATP tour, click here. For players ranked in the top 100 of the LTA British Combined Rankings, click here.

Players are ranked (where applicable) by:

  1. ATP World Tour Ranking
  2. LTA British Combined Ranking
  3. Career High ATP World Tour Ranking
  4. Career High ITF Junior Ranking
  5. Alphabetically

Rankings are accurate as of Monday 7th March.

For more information about each player, click on their photo to be taken to their bio on CoreTennis.net. Players born in the year 1997 or earlier are included on this list. For players born in 1998 or later, please see our list of Boys. For players currently studying at college in the US, please see our list of ITA College Men.


 

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Andy Murray
Year Born: 1987
ATP Ranking: 2 (= CH)
LTA Ranking: 1
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 2)

Britain’s top player for a number of years now, Dunblane-born Andy Murray has two Grand Slams to his name – winning the US Open in 2012 and Wimbledon the following year, both victories coming over Novak Djokovic in the final. Alongside Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, he became a part of the “Big Four” in men’s tennis, who dominated the major tournaments between 2008 and 2013. After slumping to No. 10 in the world following injury in late 2013, he returned to form during 2015 and once again rose to a Career High of No. 2 at the end of the 2015 season, as well as leading Great Britain to victory in their first Davis Cup triumph since 1936.

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Aljaz Bedene
Year Born: 1989
ATP Ranking: 51 (CH = 45)
LTA Ranking: 3
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 31)

Our newly adopted Brit, Slovenian-born Aljaz Bedene leapt straight to British #2 upon gaining citizenship to the United Kingdom, and hope remains that he will be the country’s go-to clay-court specialist in upcoming Davis Cup years – providing he is rendered eligible to compete, having already previously represented Slovenia. Since gaining citizenship in March 2015, Bedene has won two Challenger titles, both on Clay and both in Italy, in Rome and Todi (d. Pavlasek [CZE]; d. Kicker [ARG]) respectively, and reached the second round of a Grand Slam at the US Open for the first time in his career (l. to Young [USA]).

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Kyle Edmund
Year Born: 1995
ATP Ranking: 82 (= CH)
LTA Ranking: 4
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 8)

Arguably Britain’s brightest young prospect, Kyle Edmund had a fantastic 2015, climaxing by reaching his career high ranking at the very end of the season. Edmund reached as high as eighth in the Boys’ Rankings, mainly due to two Junior Doubles Grand Slam victories at the US Open in 2012 and at the French Open in 2013 (both w. Ferreira Silva [POR]), as well as reaching the semi-finals in the Boys’ Singles at the US Open (2011) and Wimbledon (2013), before graduating into the senior tour and winning his first ITF Futures title in October 2012 (at Birmingham, USA, d. Buchanan [USA]). After steady progress for a couple of years, he made his breakthrough in 2015 with three Challenger titles in Hong Kong in February (d. Ito [JPN]), Binghampton, USA in July (d. Frantangelo [USA]) and Copa Fila, Argentina, in November (d. Berlocq [ARG]), as well as qualifying for the Australian Open and French Open for the first time, and winning a main draw match in the latter.

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Daniel Evans
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 157 (CH = 123)
LTA Ranking: 6
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 10)

Former British Number 2 Evans underwent something of a resurgence in the latter half of 2015, showing his doubters and believers that he still has the talent to potentially break into the top 100. Evans’ greatest career spell to date came as a result of a magnificent run to the third round of the 2013 US Open (d. Nishikori [JPN], Tomic [AUS], l. to Robredo [ESP]) and subsequently making his first ever semi-final at an ATP event in Zagreb in February 2014 [d. Hajek [CZE], Berrer [GER], Kohlschreiber [GER], l. to Haas [GER]). Injury hampered most of his early efforts in 2015 but after May he won 29 out of 33 games at Futures and Challenger level, winning 4 Futures tournaments and 1 Challenger in Knoxville, USA, having been unseeded, beating Krajicek [USA] in R2 and Tiafoe [USA] in the final.

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

James Ward
Year Born: 1987
ATP Ranking: 180 (CH = 89)
LTA Ranking: 9
ITF Ranking: N/A

Having hovered just outside the world’s top 100 for the majority of the last few years, Britain’s perennial number 2 finally broke into the world’s elite (and to a CH ranking of 89) after his run to the third round at Wimbledon in 2015 (d. Vanni [ITA], Vesely [CZE], l. to Pospisil [CAN]), buoyed perhaps by his epic 2-sets-to-love-down comeback against USA’s John Isner in the Davis Cup 2015 first round in March. However, a dreadful subsequent run of nine successive defeats and the re-emergence of Dan Evans saw him replaced in the Davis Cup semi-final singles rubbers, having dropped down to #4 in Britain. His form improved in the latter stages of 2015, adding to his three career Challenger titles with a fourth in Bangalore in October (d. Menéndez-Maceiras [ESP]).

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Brydan Klein
Year Born: 1989
ATP Ranking: 204 (CH = 169)
LTA Ranking: 7
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 4)

Having shaken off his six-month ban in 2009 that led to the withdrawal of funding from Tennis Australia, the former Junior #4 has been a solid, if unspectacular player since he made the switch from Australia to his maternal Great Britain in 2013. Predominantly playing on the Challenger Tour, he has never made a singles final but came close recently in Traralgon (l. to Thompson [AUS] in SF) in October and in Cary (l. to Novikov [USA] in SF) in September. His most recent title came at the start of the year in a Futures event in Adelaide, where he beat five former countrymen in a row to claim the title.

Photo: Robbie Mendelson

Photo: Robbie Mendelson

Liam Broady
Year Born: 1994
ATP Ranking: 289 (CH = 158)
LTA Ranking: 14
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 2)

Still only young, it appeared the former Junior World #2 was about to burst onto the scene in June 2015 after coming back from two sets down to beat Matosevic [AUS] for his first ever senior Grand Slam MD victory at Wimbledon. Despite some impressive Junior pedigree, having won Wimbledon (w. Farquharson) and Australian Open (w. Ward-Hibbert) in Doubles and made the finals at Wimbledon and the US Open in Singles, he was unable to get past Goffin [BEL] in R2. He reached a CH in August after winning a match at the Lexington Challenger, but was unable to fully capitalise, ending the year with a 10-20 record in Challenger events, losing 2 in every 3. He did pick up a Futures title in Antalya (d. Bambridge in F) in October, but it did not compare to the 4 he picked up in late 2014, which contributed to his rapid decline from his CH to outside the top 300 by the end of 2015.

Joshua Milton
Year Born: 1989
ATP Ranking: 330 (CH = 284)
LTA Ranking: 17
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 139)

Splitting his season roughly equally between Futures and Challengers events, 2015 proved to be the best to date for Joshua Milton. Despite not adding to his 5 Futures career titles, he hit a career high ranking in June after reaching three successive Challenger quarter-finals, in Manchester (d. Krajicek [USA], Moriya [JPN], l. to Ram [USA]), Surbiton (d. Corrie, Saville [AUS], l. to McGee [IRL]) and Ilkley (d. Menendez-Maceiras [ESP], Bhambri [IND], l. to McGee [IRL]). His consistency was marked by an overall 31-25 record for the year (11-12 in Challengers), and his record of 7-4 in Challenger tiebreaks suggests there is more to come from the 26-year-old.

Photo: ATP

Photo: ATP

Alexander Ward
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 348 (CH = 305)
LTA Ranking: 19
ITF Ranking: N/A

Based in Spain, Alex Ward has become rather prolific at Futures level, but has never fully been able to translate this onto the Challenger Tour. Over the past two years he has competed in 37 Futures events, claiming 9 titles, but has only made the Main Draw of 3 Challenger events, amongst 8 failed qualifying attempts, winning just once (d. Struvay [COL] in Bogota, November). His sole ATP 250 MD appearance came in July 2013 having qualified for the Mercedes Cup in Stuttgart (d. Brown [GER], Minar [CZE]) where he would lose in the first round against Fognini [ITA].

Photo: Texas Sports

Photo: Texas Sports

Lloyd Glasspool
Year Born: 1993
ATP Ranking: 441 (CH = 439)
LTA Ranking: 22
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 602)

Having graduated from the University of Texas in the summer of 2015, Birmingham-born Lloyd Glasspool proceeded to make his first real mark on the ATP World Rankings that very summer, marching to the final of the Ireland F1 in Dublin in July (l. to Smethurst) and the semis at the Finland F2 the following month (l. to Sam Barry [IRL]) after defeating the top seed in R32. Since then he has reached a career high ranking after his first career title in Heraklion in October (d. Jankovic [SRB] in F) and a second in El Kantaoui (d. Ortega-Olemdo [ESP] in F). Whilst at Texas, he was the NCAA Doubles Champion (w. Søren Hess-Olesen [NOR]) and was an ITA All-American in Doubles (2014, 2015) and Singles (2015), reaching a year-end CH ITA ranking of #29 in his graduation year.

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Daniel Cox
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 466 (CH = 206)
LTA Ranking: 30
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 31)

A member of the class of 1990 which tend to hover inside the top 500 mark, Daniel Cox hit his career high in July 2014 after a run to the semi-finals of the Binghamton Challenger, eventually losing to Stakhovsky [UKR]. In general, 2014 was Cox’s best year to date, picking up two Futures titles, both in Doha, in April (d. Mertens [BEL]) and December (d. Bossel [SUI]) as well as a clutch of semi-final appearances. 2015 yielded a solitary Futures title in Preston in February (d. A. Ward) but a level of consistency that took him to 6 finals, of which 4 were in Britain, which kept him within striking distance of the top 300.

Photo: WN.com

Photo: WN.com

Richard Gabb
Year Born: 1992
ATP Ranking: 485 (CH = 410)
LTA Ranking: 24
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 104)

Since 2011 Richard Gabb has been a regular on the ITF Futures tour, having played in more than 20 tournaments each year since joining the senior tour. His efforts, though, have only yielded 2 titles, 1 in Marathon in October 2013 (d. Angelinos [GRE] in F) and more recently in Sharm El-Sheikh this October (d. Cias [POL] in F). He is known, however, for his consistency, having won 25 out of 28 first round matches in 2015 and having made the QF or better in 15 of these tournaments.

Photo: Luke Bambridge Tennis

Photo: Luke Bambridge Tennis

Luke Bambridge
Year Born: 1995
ATP Ranking: 486 (= CH)
LTA Ranking: 15
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 22)

Having only been on the senior tour for two years, ‘Bambo’, who showed good promise as a youngster, has already shown he is willing to have a crack at Challenger level, having made two MDs and even won a R1 tie in Samarkand (d. Dustov [UZB]). Yet to win a title until the very end of 2015, he came close in October 2015 in Antalya (l. to Broady in F) and finally claimed his elusive first championship in Doha in December (d. Kellovsky [CZE]). Alongside Broady, Bambridge made his Grand Slam debut at Wimbledon in 2015 in the Doubles; the pair were beaten by eventual runners-up Jamie Murray and John Peers [AUS] in straight sets.

Daniel Smethurst
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 489 (CH = 234)
LTA Ranking: 25
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 29)

After showing promise as a junior, Daniel Smethurst has excelled more so in doubles tour than in singles, with his current and career high doubles ranking both higher than that of his singles. 2015 has been a slower year for Smethy, having only played 14 tournaments compared to 22 in 2014 and 23 in 2013. The highlight came in July where he reached two finals, in Frinton and Dublin, losing the former (to Evans) and winning the latter (vs Glasspool).

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Marcus Willis
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 510 (CH = 322)
LTA Ranking: 18
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 15)

Having reached an impressive career high of #15 as a Junior, Marcus Willis’ senior career since has been predominantly spent on the Futures circuit, having only recently tried his hand at Challenger events, to varying degrees of success. He made the MD of 4 Challengers in 2015, having qualified twice and been given two WCs. His sole Challenger MD win of 2015 came in Glasgow in February (d. Viola [ITA]), although he had more success in 2014, most notably reaching the quarter-finals in Knoxville (d. Buchanan [USA], Sandgren [USA], l. to Broady) in November. His Futures record is consistent if unspectacular, having picked up two 2015 titles in Spain and Egypt and reaching 4 semis in Britain throughout the year, losing all four to Daniels Cox (twice), Evans and Smethurst.

Photo: eadt.co.uk

Photo: eadt.co.uk

David Rice
Year Born: 1989
ATP Ranking: 528 (CH = 283)
LTA Ranking: 27
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 25)

David Rice’s career high came after a storming start to 2014, reaching two consecutive finals in Sunderland and Sheffield, where he faced Daniel Smethurst in both finals winning one and losing the other. Since then he has picked up a further 3 Futures titles (with a career total of 7), but despite having made 9 Challenger MDs in the past two years, has only made it past the first round three times; in Nottingham June 2014 (d. Kutrovsky [BUL], l. to Müller [LUX]), Surbiton June 2015 (d. Myneni [IND], l to Kudla [USA]) and Charlottesville November 2015 (d. Duckworth [AUS], l. to Kozlov [USA]).

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

Edward Corrie
Year Born: 1988
ATP Ranking: 531 (CH = 215)
LTA Ranking: 31
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 330)

Edward Corrie was ranked as highly as #250 as recently as August 2015, but a prolonged absence of tournaments and games towards the end of the year meant his ranking dramatically tailed off as we moved into the New Year. He only picked up one title this year (in Sherbrooke [CAN] in March, d. Sandgren [USA]) compared to 3 in both 2014 and 2013, but this can be attributed to a marked increase in Challenger involvement, winning exactly a third of his games on the Challenger circuit in 2015, compared to two-thirds in Futures events.

Photo: tennisalternative.com

Photo: tennisalternative.com

Neil Pauffley
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 553 (CH = 406)
LTA Ranking: 23
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 57)

His best years having come in 2012 and 2013, Neil Pauffley finally picked up his first Futures title in over two years in November 2015, stringing together a lovely run in Tipton, beating top junior Karimov [UZB] and fellow Brits O’Mara and Glasspool along the way. Pauffley is a prolific Futures player, having competed in 99 MDs over the course of the last 4 years, but just a solitary Challenger in Bangkok in 2013, losing in the first round after gaining his first (and only, to date) DA into a Challenger draw.

Photo: coretennis.net

Photo: coretennis.net

Evan Hoyt
Year Born: 1995
ATP Ranking: 563 (= CH)
LTA Ranking: 21
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 53)

Alongside Kyle Edmund, Hoyt was a part of Great Britain’s Junior Davis Cup winning team in 2011, and towards the end of 2015 really began to made huge strides towards unleashing his potential on the senior tour. After recovering from an injury that scuppered most of his 2014 season, it was not until a remarkable run of results in Tunisia, including his first two senior titles (d. Griekspoor [NED]; d. Perez Sanz [ESP] in respective Fs) in late 2015 that he began to shine, shooting up to what would become his career high ranking.

Photo: College Tennis Online

Photo: College Tennis Online

Joe Salisbury
Year Born: 1992
ATP Ranking: 650 (CH = 559)
LTA Ranking: 16
ITF Ranking: N/A

Another US College graduate to pick up his first Futures title this year, Joe Salisbury graduated in summer 2014 and set to work quickly, playing tournament after tournament in Great Britain, Spain, France and Sweden, although generally gaining more experience than ranking points. But it paid off: 2015 saw him turn his 2014 12-15 win-loss record at Futures level into a 19-16 one, including a huge title win in Danderyd (d Mikael Ymer [SWE] in F) as well as a more consistent collection of SFs and QFs in late summer.

Photo: ITF

Photo: ITF

James Marsalek
Year Born: 1992
ATP Ranking: 696 (CH = 537)
LTA Ranking: 29
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 64)

After a rather disappointing 2014 (ending on a 18-32 win-loss record in Futures and dipping as low as 968th in the world), ‘Marsa’ underwent something of resurgence after recovering his Futures form and having a decent crack at the Challenger Tour in 2015. He qualified for the MD in the Rennes Challenger before losing in R1 to Jaziri [TUN], and made three Futures semi-finals in Preston (l. to Cox), Doha (l. to Pospisil [CAN]) and Falun (l. to Eriksson [SWE]), improving to a season-high of 609, not hugely far away from his career best, which remains a realistic target. His sole career title came in May 2013 at the Israel F9 Futures event in Ramat Hasharon, beating three Japanese players (Niki, Onosawa, Sekiguchi) en route to the title.

Photo: tennis-pronostics.com

Photo: tennis-pronostics.com

Toby Martin
Year Born: 1993
ATP Ranking: 737 (CH = 641)
LTA Ranking: 34
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 254)

Without a Futures title in four years of senior tennis, Toby Martin scored, for the first time, a positive win-loss record coming out of 2015, ending with 23 wins from 44 main draw matches. He struggled in his first year on the senior tour, winning just 10 games and losing 25, but has gradually begun to improve and has made two ITF finals in the last two years, most recently in Israel in May 2015 (l. to Weintraub [ISR]). On the 2015 AEGON British Tour, his best moment came in March where he triumphed in Edgbaston over a field that included the likes of Willis, Pauffley, Evans and Hoyt.

Photo: gallery.je

Photo: gallery.je

Scott Clayton
Year Born: 1994
ATP Ranking: 770 (CH = 756)
LTA Ranking: 35
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 82)

Scott Clayton made a mini-breakthrough towards the end of 2015 in Egypt – reaching his first Futures semi-final and, as a result, shooting up to his career high. Still young at just 21 years of age, he’s still struggling to get seedings in Futures events, despite generally ranked high enough for a DA, and needs to turn his win-loss record over the year into a positive one to gain any real success – although records of 7-19 (2013), 8-16 (2014) and 18-21 (2015) are gradually improving to suggest 2016 might be his year.

Jonny O’Mara
Year Born: 1995
ATP Ranking: 835 (CH = 829)
LTA Ranking: 28
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 58)

In the two years since leaving the Junior tour, O’Mara has displayed some flashes of excellence that suggest there is a lot more to come from the youngster. 2015 started badly, losing five consecutive R1 matches in Croatia and then Britain, but he rallied and made two semis by the end of the year, one in Egypt in October and the second in Tipton in November (d. Crawford, Geerts [BEL], Corrie; l. to Pauffley). With a win-loss record of 10-11 from 12 main draws, he’s not far away from turning that slight negative into more wins than losses.

Matthew Short
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 865 (CH = 708)
LTA Ranking: 94
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 115)

Perennially at the level of the game that either involves scraping into the Main Draw or being seeded in Qualifying, Matthew Short has yet to win a senior title but did improve his win-loss record to 13-14 in 2015, his career best. This was in part due to a couple of semi-final runs in Spain in April and June (l. to Folie [BEL] and Gomez-Herrera [ESP] in respective SFs). Based in Spain, 12 of his 14 main draw events in 2015 took place in either Spain or Portugal.

Jamie Whiteford
Year Born: 1990
ATP Ranking: 913 (CH = 904)
LTA Ranking: 163
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 368)

Having previously only picked up single rankings points, Whiteford’s career took two huge leaps in 2015 – the first when he reached the quarter-finals in Dublin in June (d. Mousley [AUS], Rosenzweig [FRA]; l. to Thomson [IRL]) and the second when he made a stunning run to the final of the Egypt F35 in Sharm El-Sheikh, beating O’Mara, Gabb and Bambridge before defeat to Frenchman Sakharov in the final. 2013-14 saw him absent entirely from the ITF tour, so his comeback in 2015 has been a welcome surprise.

Photo: Shropshire Live

Photo: Shropshire Live

Tom Farquharson
Year Born: 1992
ATP Ranking: 957 (CH = 429)
LTA Ranking: 156
ITF Ranking: N/A (CH = 74)

Sadly, Tom Farquharson’s meagre 5 tournaments in 2015 looks to suggest he may be considering a career elsewhere, despite having shown some real potential in 2014 and in the glimpses we saw of him this year. He played only 13 tournaments in 2014 but picked up 2 titles, in The Wirral (d. Goodall, Marsalek, Corrie, Bambridge, Smethurst) and Manchester (d. Bossel [SUI] in F), and in the 5 tournaments he played, he made it to 4 quarter-finals, finishing 2015 with an impressive but sparse 10-5 win-loss record. He did, of course, win the Boys’ Doubles at Wimbledon (w. Broady) in 2010. We hope to see more of Tom in 2016.

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